Under the blistering exposure to sun, frequent soakings by rain, and radical temperature shifts, the paints that cover exterior siding and trim surfaces face some of the most demanding conditions possible. Modern paint chemistry makes today's paints remarkably adept at handling these situations, and the house surfaces that once required painting every two or three years can now sometimes go a decade before they require repainting. But under certain conditions—or when the preparation or application has been less than ideal—there are a number of common problems that occur with exterior paint jobs. Understanding the origins and solutions for these ten common problems will help you address them quickly and avoid them in the future. 
Once you find a painting pro you want to hire, be sure to have a detailed contract that includes the scope of work and prices for all materials and paint that is being used. Find out how many coats of paint will be applied as well as the brand of paint that will be used. Most decent painting pros will use quality brands like BEHR or Sherwin Williams. The contract should also spell out the time frame to complete the project and as well as set up clean up details.
Generally making a paint estimate is very difficult job yet a necessary one. Understanding key mechanics behind every quote is the basis which might not only enable us to understand nut also do estimation for ourselves. To begin with, we need to understand the basic structure and volume of the work to be undertaken. Along with the nature and type of the paint and skills set required for it must be considered. We should also carefully account for the possible “hard areas” like hose mounts etc. along with other items that are fixed. Estimate for the additional costs for example moving furniture and cleaning services after the job is done should also be added to the estimate. We should also consider the difficulties that are expected to be encountered during work e.g. high structures and ladder-based work. Cost of consumables such as supplies, cleaning tools and other materials to be used in additional capacity are also to be added to the estimate
Hi Conaz, good question. There’s a really good breakdown of all painting equipment (cost, supplies list etc.) here . As far as your other costs, I would break it down into categories, similar to how an accountant would do it: Marketing Expense, Insurance/Workers Comp., Gas/Mileage. Once you’ve discovered this monthly overhead you can determine your markup. We always try to make 40-50% gross profit on a paint job before any other expenses. Your net profit will be determined by the size of your business. For example, one painting company with 40 employees may only have a net profit of 10%, but a smaller operation; One owner and one crew may have a net profit of 35%. You should decide beforehand what you want to make per job, factoring in all your costs, and then create a consistent bidding process to make what you want.
The truth is that there are a lot of things that can go wrong with a sloppy painting job and the crappy results will be instantly visible. Prepping the ceiling and walls as well as carefully repairing any damages is 50% of a successful job. However, cheap painters typically rush through this part of the project. Consequently, you see small holes in the walls, paint stains, bubbling paint and other ugly errors. House Painting Broomfield Colorado
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